Sweden Next To Demand Equal Pay

“I thought that Sweden already was equal!” Around the globe, Sweden is often portrayed as the sanctuary of equality, it’s a country that everyone looks up to and there is often a feeling of Sweden, due to other countries falling short, is infallible in these areas.

You thought wrong, pal.

Yes, a lot of things are good and really advanced in the countries of the north, like societal structures regarding health care, education etc. As a young girl, there are often options to play and the players in the top women’s league do get paid in Sweden (albeit very little and they still have to have studies or a job on the side.) A historic moment came in 2018 as Norway started paying their male and female national teams the same amount of money.

But I think a lot of people still don’t understand the reason why Ballon d’Or winner Ada Hegerberg did not play for Norway at the World Cup this summer.

every generation of players has had their fights to take, regarding everything from training times, material, lost earnings, broadcasting times etc. and now salaries and compensation. Previous generations have achieved amazing results on the pitch but never received any economic compensation worth the name

Just because a lot of things might be better in the Scandinavian countries, or sound better on paper, doesn’t mean that it is actually good, or that there is no room for improvement. Yes, equal pay for the Norwegian national teams is great, and it goes a long way. But the Lyon-striker chose not to play for her country because there are still things that need to be developed, like the way that the athletes are being treated, and she felt like she was being held back in the team. Kosovare Asllani has expressed similar concerns regarding the professionality and level of the Swedish top league Damallsvenskan, and the midfielder should know, having played in both England and France. Euro 2017 silver-medalists Denmark had to go on a strike only months after having placed second at the Euros when the Danish football association failed to present them with an improved collective agreement, as the players amongst other things were asking for – you guessed it – better pay.

The Swedish women’s national team just returned from France where they claimed a bronze medal after a fantastic run in the tournament, and they were greeted by thousands of people in Gothenburg where they were all celebrating together. But once the celebrations died down, questions remained. Just a few days ago, the Swedish football association was reported to the Equality Ombudsman, accused of discriminating against the Swedish women’s national team based on gender, which was followed up two days ago by an open letter, signed by over 50 female players, former national team and elite players, that have been representing Sweden (or been close to) since the ’70s onwards. In the letter, they’re demanding equal treatment and equal pay for the same amount of work, arguing that every generation of players has had their fights to take, “regarding everything from training times, material, lost earnings, broadcasting times etc. and now salaries and compensation. Previous generations have achieved amazing results on the pitch but never received any economic compensation worth the name.” And although these players have hung up their boots, they want to continue the fight for the national team of today.

Sweden women's national team
The Swedish team gives thanks to their unwavering support. Source

They’re defusing the old argument that “the men generate more revenue than women”, simply stating that “if the men’s team now generates so much more off of their games, then that’s good for Swedish football as a whole, right?” According to the letter, the FA are pitting the compensation for the men’s against the women’s, meaning that in order to increase the compensation for the women, they would have to decrease the compensation for the men, ultimately putting the male and female players against each other.

The Swedish FA has refused to go out with any numbers regarding the contracts and the compensation that the men’s and the women’s teams are receiving, shutting down like clams and only referring to the contracts being classified. The answer received from the football governing body on the matter is simply that they perceive their division of compensation to be “fair“.

Although one could argue that the absence of numbers speaks loud and clear for them.

Looking at the way that the two Swedish teams have performed historically, the women’s team has done a lot better than the men’s team. In a mere eight World Cups (for which they’ve qualified to every single one) they’ve gotten four medals, whereas the men’s team has qualified to 12 out of 21 editions, and has three medals to show for it. And let’s not even start on the Euros, where the women have one gold medal, three silver and one bronze, and the men have won … nothing.

This is a similar story to the one of the US women’s national team, who sued their employer US Soccer Federation earlier this year over gender discrimination and then went and won their fourth World Cup (so, you know, a few more gold medals than the Swedish team but, the point is clear), further underlining how superior they are to the US men’s national team who despite this get paid a lot more.

We have yet to see what will happen in each of these cases, but one thing is clear. Equal pay might not solve all of the equality issues in the world, but it would give the patriarchy a kick in the balls.

Quotes are from the open letter published in Expressen, translated by me.

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WC Countdown: Group E – Netherlands

We are now on the last team in the second to last group in the World Cup Countdown, and the tournament is only a few weeks away. Let’s take a look at the Netherlands!

The Netherlands, also called the Oranje Leeuwinnen (the Orange Lionesses), come into this tournament grasping onto one of the last straws, having had to qualify for the last spot. The Euro winners, who claimed the title on home soil in 2017, have only qualified for one World Cup before and that was Canada 2015, where they didn’t get further than the round of 16. But this time around they will come in with some confidence, having beaten several tough teams to get to that last sweet qualification spot, and surely the magic of their Euros win still linger over them. They played Northern Ireland twice, Republic of Ireland, Slovakia and Norway, winning every game but the one against the Scandinavians, which was enough to place them only second in the group, after Norway who qualified directly. This meant they had to qualify for that last spot, playing both Denmark and Switzerland over two legs, winning both games 4-1 on aggregate.

When looking at the Leeuwinnen squad, there is one star that shines very bright indeed. Lieke Martens, the midfielder/forward who is one of the best female footballers in the world, has been the one leading her team through the qualification process. With her dribbling skills and her intelligent plays, she contributes a lot on the field and not just in terms of goals. She was a vital cog in the team that won the 2017 Euros and she was voted The Best FIFA Women’s Player 2017. We also have an up and coming star that just doesn’t seem to be able to stop scoring. The young but already oh-so-mature Vivianne Miedema scored seven goals in the nine games she represented the Netherlands in on their qualification journey, and in England, where she represents Arsenal in the WSL (Women’s Super League), she was the top scorer of the season with 22 goals in 20 games. Talk about lethal!

Danielle Van De Donk, a teammate with Miedema in Arsenal, will also be an integral presence in the team, as she can contribute with vital goals as well as set her teammates up thanks to her creativity on the pitch. Shanice Van Der Sanden, Lineth Beerensteyn and Sherida Spitse are other important influences contributing with goals.

Defender Kika van Es spoke to FIFA about the importance of the Euros win and what an impact it’s had on the team in terms of expectations, and the perception of women’s football in the Netherlands.

“We want to be underdogs and we are telling everybody that because this is only our second World Cup.

“The World Cup is so different to the EUROs, being world champions will be very difficult, so we see ourselves as underdogs, which is better for us,” she said.

“Before the EUROs, nobody knew who we were, and then a month later it was crazy.

“Little kids can now dream of being a professional and it’s now easier to play football with other girls. We also showed parents that football is also for girls, not only for boys.

“For us, we think it’s good that we are playing in the north of France, so a lot of Dutch fans can come and support us. I think it is going to be a great World Cup and a great year,” she continued.

Sarina Wiegman
Head coach Wiegman, source

Head coach Sarina Wiegman is one of the reasons for the team’s huge success, and she’s had a massive impact on the team since she arrived in January 2017. With only a few months to go until the Euros kicking off on home soil and after having been an assistant coach and interim coach to the national side during several years, it was finally her time at the helm, and she did a fantastic job leading the team to victory at the Euros, raising the confidence and the attitude of the team and encouraging them to play a more attacking style of football, which took well amongst the group of players and they gave back to their coach by playing very attractive and winning football.

The team seems to have a strong and successful identity with the 4-3-3 formation, allowing their creativity to flood on the wings and build from a strong defensive foundation.

The Leuuwinnen has had a few games leading up to the tournament. They won against South Africa 2-1 back in January, they featured in the Algarve Cup where they lost against Spain and Poland, and drew 1-1 with China, winning on penalties. They’ve also played Mexico and Chile in two friendlies, winning 2-0 and 7-0, and are going up against Australia in a send-off match before the tournament begins in France, that game being played on the 1st of June, kick off 18:15.

That’s a wrap on our Orange Lionesses, who will go up against some tough competition in group E. How do you think that they will do? Let us know in the comment section!

WC Countdown: Group E – New Zealand

We head deeper into group E and next up is New Zealand.

The Football Ferns, which is the nickname of the island’s beloved team, will head to their fifth World Cup, having qualified for their first back in 1991 for the inaugural cup in China. It would then be a 14-year long wait until they qualified for their next one, the 2007 edition, and they’ve qualified for all the others since, although never being able to make it out of the group stages. The road to France was quite a straightforward one for the Ferns, as they went through the qualification with 42 goals scored and 0 conceded in their five games. They went up against  Tonga, Cook Island, Fiji and New Caledonia, winning with numbers like 11-0 and 8-0 in the OFC Women’s Nations Cup.

Ali Riley is one of the names to look out for in the squad, as the vastly experienced fullback is looking to add another World Cup to her belt, having already played in three World Cups and three Olympics. The team captain is a strong presence at the back, and with her knowledge of big tournaments, she’ll be a huge asset. This is quite the comeback squad that coach Tom Sermanni will bring to France. Striker Hannah Wilkinson suffered a serious ACL-injury back in October, but thanks to her grit and determination she has managed to work her way back to match-fitness and is one of the 23 players named in the squad going to the World Cup.

hannah wilkinson
Wilkinson representing the Ferns, source

“I am so honoured to be named in this squad. It was an amazing feeling last week when I got the call from Tom. I am also really proud of myself because I know that I have worked really hard to get back,” she said.

“The first thing I thought about when the injury happened was France. That my World Cup dream was over. But my mentality from the get-go was to focus and work hard every day. I had doubt coming from all areas so that was a real test to listen to my inner self and my inner belief. Month after month I saw the progress. Suddenly we hit five months and I was looking pretty good to come back. There have been a lot of important lessons and it has been quite a journey,” she continued.

Another forward who has made it into the team is Emma Kete, who got the spot ahead of other strikers despite only having her first appearance for the Ferns since 2015 earlier this year.

“Emma’s comeback is a great lesson in maturity and how you can really play your way back in. If you are really focused, work hard and look to do the right things, you have got an opportunity. She has come back into the fold after being away from the team for a long time, but she has shown her intent to be a part of this squad,” coach Sermanni said of the forward.

Another important player to have on the team is defender Abby Erceg, a real veteran who has more than 100 senior appearances for the Ferns and who came out of retirement for a second time in January, only to be selected for the team for a fourth World Cup.

The Scottish coach Sermanni has a lot of experience in the women’s game, and this will be his fourth World Cup, having started his illustrious career with Australia back in 1995. He rejoined the Matildas to lead them to the quarterfinals in 2007 and 2011, took over the United States women’s national team for a year, was amongst the staff for the Canadian women’s national team during the World Cup 2015, then Orlando Pride for two years, before returning to international duty in October 2018 with the Ferns.

The Scot is a welcome refresher in the team after the previous coach Andreas Heraf caused a lot of drama. The Austrian coach spoke after the team lost 2-0 to Japan back in June 2018, saying that New Zealand “will never have (the) quality to compete” with the likes of Japan, which caused a lot of upset and lead to serious allegations emerging about the coach. The players association sent the NZF a letter voicing concerns about the coach, and 13 players had signed the letter saying they did not want to work under him anymore, as the coach allegedly upheld a ‘culture of intimidation’ and Ercag, the retired player who returned, described him as ‘delusional’.

Sermanni seems to change in between formations, depending on what kind of team they’re meeting, and against the likes of Norway and Australia, where he seemed to feel the need to be more defensively rigid, they played a 5-3-2, and they’ve also played the likes of 4-2-3-1 and 4-1-4-1.

New Zealand participated in the Cup of Nations, which is a friendlies tournament consisting of four teams – Australia, Argentina, South Korea and the Ferns themselves, who suffered losses to the Matildas and South Korea but beat Argentina 2-0. They also played a friendly against Norway, which they won 1-0 and is considered a huge win for the side. New Zealand is going to play some more last minute friendlies before the World Cup, going up against the US on the 17th of May, England on the 1st of June and Wales on the 4th of June, before they kick off their World Cup campaign on the 11th.

That’s a wrap on the New Zealand team, and this inspirational group of athletes is surely one to keep an eye out for. But will they be able to make it past their group that contains tough opponents like Canada and Cameroon? Let us know what you think in the comment section below!

WC Countdown: Group E – Canada

Onto the second to last group and first up in group E is Canada.

Canada has worked their way onto the international stage and slowly but surely gained recognition as a tough team to beat. They lost out on the third place to the USA at the World Cup 2003 and made it to the quarter-finals of their first Olympic women’s football tournament in 2008. They’ve won bronze at the Olympics twice, in 2012 and 2016, and they hosted the World Cup back in 2015, getting kicked out in the quarter-final against England. Canada started off the 2018 CONCACAF Women’s Championship, the qualification tournament to the World Cup, by beating Jamaica 2-0. They then went on to beat Cuba 12-0, Costa Rica 3-1 and Panama 7-0, before coming up against the hosts and world champions USA, to whom they lost 0-2.

The biggest name in the Canadian team is without a doubt Cristine Sinclair, who has made a huge mark on the team and has ensured that she will always be remembered fondly by the Canadians. The current captain of the side is the top scorer for her country (of all time!), who also has the most assists and most caps of any Canadian player. The forward who is now 35 years old is still in her prime, scoring four goals in five games throughout the qualification tournament, and she scored a wonderful hattrick for her club in a 4-4 thriller just the other day. This will be the fifth World Cup that she takes part in. Other players that were on a good scoring streak during the qualification process were Adriana Leon, who scored a whopping six goals in the four games she took part in. 17-year-old Jordyn Huitema scored another four goals in three games, and Nichelle Prince contributed with three goals in four games. Stephanie Labbe is the experienced goalkeeper but 23-year-old Kailen Sheridan got some time between the sticks in the qualification process and is an exciting prospect.

Canada women's soccer team
Fans together with their soccer team. Source.

Kenneth Heiner-Møller is the head coach for the Canadian side and the Danish coach has been with the team since 2015 when he was the assistant coach, before becoming head coach in 2018. He led the Danish women’s national football team to the 2007 World Cup in China, where he and his players accused the Chinese team, whom they were going up against, of harassment as well as covert surveillance. The Swedish coaching team, Marika Domanski-Lyfors and Pia Sundhage, did not know anything about it and Heiner-Møller exonerated them but refused to shake hands after the game. With the Canadian team, he’s not had a lot of time to achieve things just yet, but he got them to the World Cup 2019.

Møller has chosen to go with a few different formations, not being afraid to rotate and continuously changing things up, which can be seen as a healthy sign for a developing squad. The main two formations that the Danish coach has chosen to play with are the 4-2-3-1 and 3-1-4-2, sometimes switching it up with a 4-3-3.

The Canadian side has played a few games during the spring, going to Portugal for the Algarve Cup where they came up against a few strong sides. They drew 0-0 with Iceland, they earned a hard-fought win over Scotland 1-0 and in the third place match between Canada and Sweden, the North American side came out the stronger one after winning on penalties.

That’s some information about Canada, one of the strong teams in group E. Do you believe they will make it out of their group? Let us know below in the comment section!

Five Lessons Goalkeeping Taught Me As a Female Football Fan

The first time I had to go in goals as an adult was at a futsal tournament with my university team and I was too hungover to run, so after 20 minutes I told my coach that I needed to go in goals or I would not make it. Which ended up being quite the successful initiative, and as my new team were looking for a goalkeeper I volunteered. One year into this journey I am loving my new position and enjoying myself thoroughly.

Along the way, I have evolved so much, obviously as a player, going from playing as a left wing for the better part of a decade to going in between the sticks, but also as a person and a female football fan. I was opened up to a whole new perspective, being positioned at the end of the pitch, and it forced me to view the game and my role in it in a totally different way. That, in turn, opened up to new views on my life, my fandom and my role in it, as well as how I want to practice it going forward.

The lessons that I’ve taken from goalkeeping are applicable in the game as well as in life:

1. Don’t Be Afraid

Fear limits you! This is the first rule, which is very applicable to the goalkeeper life (I mean, you are voluntarily stepping in as the last person between the striker and the goal) but it’s also a fundamental realisation that has huge impact on your life. I used to be so afraid; afraid of doing anything wrong, being wrong, fucking up – but what you have to realise is this: as a goalkeeper you are going to make mistakes and let in goals. Fact is, you’ll probably let in more goals than you keep out, and you have to be okay with that, it’s just part of it and you’ll learn from every mistake in order to be able to keep more goals out.

Same goes for life, where many people stay in their comfort zones and rarely makes mistakes. It’s comfortable but that’s not where the magic happens. What if I’d been too afraid to devote myself to Tottenham, my football team, because I was put off by the scrutiny present in the football community?

2. Be Demanding

As the person furthest back on the pitch, you have a unique view that no one else as, and you have to use that to help your team and guide your defence, who do not have the same advantage as you. That means that sometimes you will have to be very demanding and steer them to where you need them to be, which in turn means that you have to trust yourself to have the view and the skills necessary for it.

Also in life, you have to take command of your own ship and demand more of yourself, trusting yourself to know what is best for you. That includes knowing that you belong in a space (for example, a pub or a football stadium) even when the people around you make you feel otherwise.

3. Ask For It

This one is vital. In order to get anything you want – that promotion at work, the cute person you’ve been eyeing for a while, or the ball in the game, you’re gonna have to ask for it. In order to receive the ball in a position where you know that you can do something with it, where you set the tone, you’re going to have to ask your teammates to pass it to you. That way you take charge of the game, and the same rules apply to anything that you want – no one is just going to hand it to you. It’s yours for the taking!

4. Take Up Space

If you take up more physical space in the goal, the goal shrinks and significantly minimises the target for the striker trying to score on you. It makes a lot of sense when you look at it from the striker’s point of view, but when you’re in that goal it can feel counterintuitive to charge out towards a player that is running towards you full speed with the ball, but that’s what you have to do. Same in life, it can really scary, but it’s difficult to give opportunities to people that you do not know are there because they’re not taking up any space.

Note, it’s not just about taking up the space – you have to believe that you’re allowed to actually take up the space, and that you’re not just there because of luck or because someone wanted to be kind to you. The notion of being allowed to take up space is a belief that is hard for women, in my experience. I certainly struggle with it a lot. As women, we’re taught, from a young age, that ‘girls sit down and obey’ whereas the boys are rowdy and taking up space. Well, it’s time to change that and as adults we can lead by example.#GetBig as Karen Bardsley always says.

5. Use Your Voice

Your defence won’t know what it is that you want or need from them if you do not tell them. It’s worth repeating: as the goalkeeper you have the most special view on the pitch. There will be times when you’ll come from behind and your defenders won’t see you and you’re all just so focused on clearing the ball that, without the communication, it’ll most likely turn into a big mess.

It is equally as important to use your voice in life because you have a unique take on life just like everyone else, and you have to learn to speak up, for others but most of all for yourself. Especially in my fandom this has been a useful tool to gain, as I’ve come to understand that few people are willing to speak up for female football fans, in general in the media, but also when you’re in the pub/at the stadium alone. And nowadays there are so many amazing female football collectives and fans emerging, and recommending people to follow them is a great use of the voice, for example.

Also, remember to be kind, to yourself and to others, it goes a long way. And don’t compare your chapter three to someone else’s chapter 20.

WC Countdown: Group D – Japan

Last – but definitely not least – in group D we have Japan.

This is a team with a long history in the game and they are the most successful women’s national team in the Asian Football Confederation. They’ve been fierce competitors in Asia for quite some time but in 2011 they took the world by storm when they went and won the Women’s World Cup 2011, beating the USA in the final to become only the fourth women’s world champions. Then they went and won silver at the World Cup 2015, this time losing to the Americans. This year they won both the Asian Games and the Asian Women’s Cup, which also served as the qualification route for the World Cup. In the process, they beat Vietnam and China, drew with Korea and Australia, only to end up against the Aussie’s again in the final, beating them 1-0.

Japan has a very young team and many of their World Cup-winning squad has retired in the past few years, leaving coach Asako Takakura-Takemoto to try and find a new team setup. Legends like Homare Sawa – who captained the side to their 2011 WC gold and 2012 Olympics silver -, Aya Miyama, Shinobu Ohno and Yūki Nagasato were all part of those glorious years in which the team erupted on the world stage. But now it is up to this young side to keep up with the legacy that the previous generation set up.

Nadeshiko win World Cup 2011
Nadeshiko celebrating their 2011 World Cup win. Source

A player that is still young but has vast experience of international football due to having played in the national team since she was 17, is Mana Iwabuchi. She bloomed out on the international scene as a 15-year-old, representing her country at the inaugural U-17 World Cup, and this is going to be the forward’s third senior World Cup, having won gold back in 2011 and silver in 2015, and she’s one of the integral cogs in Japan’s machinery, and she scored two of the goals en route to Japan’s WC qualification. Kumo Yokoyama is another important goalscorer and contributed four goals in four games at the Asian Cup. Yuka Momik scored two goals in three games at the SheBelieves cup for Japan, and Yui Hasegawa got on the scoresheet as well.

Another experienced and important player in the pursuit of glory is Rumi Utsugi. The 30 -year-old has already participated in three World Cups with Nadeshiko and she is a strong presence and serves as a reminder to the young players of the previous generation and their feats. In an interview with FIFA she commented on the impact that their 2011 World Cup win has had in Japan:

“Before 2011, we had a much smaller population of women who played football in Japan. But since our victory in 2011, we have more players aspiring to become professional or just to play football for fun. I’m so pleased that the women’s football population has grown so dramatically in Japan since then.”

The Japanese style is typically centred on organisation and intelligent movement, so we’ll try and combine those with creative ideas and fresh thinking, which are especially evident in the younger players in our squad. These should be our strengths and I hope we’ll be able to demonstrate them in our team play,” she continues.

Head coach Takakura-Takemoto took over the Nadeshiko squad back in 2016, succeeding the legendary Norio Sasaki. It’s a difficult stepping into such big shoes, but Takakura-Takemoto has done a very good job so far. She used to represent Japan herself, before becoming a coach for various Japan national youth teams, with her most notable achievement being the gold at the 2014 U-17 World Cup. Since she has embraced her role as coach for the senior team she has led the side to gold at the Asian Cup and at the Asian games. Takakura-Takemoto favours a 4-4-2 formation and rarely switches it up, except for when she employs a 4-4-1-1, letting one of the strikers drop.

Japan took part in the SheBelieves Cup in March, drawing against the hosts the USA (2-2) and beating Brazil 3-1 before losing, in what was considered to be the ‘final’, 0-3 against England who went on and won the tournament. It was a torn performance from the young Japanese side and the overall expectation was that they would do better, looking lost at times. Since then they’ve played France and Germany in two friendlies, losing to the French 3-1 and drawing 2-2 with the Germans.

That’s a wrap on the last team out in group D, the most technically difficult out of the six groups looking at the official FIFA-rankings of the teams (Scotland ranked 20, England ranked 4, Argentina ranked 36 and Japan ranked 8), landing on an average of 17. It remains to be seen how this group plays out. Do you think that Japan makes it out of the group? Let us know in the comments below!

WC Countdown: Group D – Argentina

The next team out in group D is no other than Argentina.

It is a triumphant return to the international scene for the Argentinians, who last participated in the 2007 World Cup in China, 12 years ago, and which they’ve only participated in twice –  never managing to get out of the group stage. It has been a tough road to get to France for this team, and not solemnly from a qualification-route point of view. Only last month did the country finally decide to make the women’s league professional (by no means on the same level as the men’s, but still) after a lot of fighting, from the national team in general who went on a strike for equality  last year and were seen posing cupping their ears (‘is anyone listening?’), a photo which went viral at the Copa América and the issue finally got some recognition. Furthermore, players like Macarena Sánchez have played a huge role and they’ve used social media to draw attention to the fact that female football players in Argentina get very little to no help from their clubs or their national team whatsoever, whether that regards training clothes, food or treatment for injured players.

On their way to qualification, they played in the Copa América Femenina and they beat Bolivia, Ecuador, Venezuela and Colombia, but lost to Brazil twice and then to Chile, causing them to end up in third place. This, in turn, caused them to face a play-off in the CONCACAF-CONMEBOL and they had to play Panama over two legs, winning 4-0 and drawing 1-1, and qualifying them for the World Cup.

Estefania Banini is captain of the team and the midfielder is dangerous in front of the goal as well as from outside the area. The 28-year-old, who is an important cog in the Argentinian set-up, scored three goals in seven games at the Copa América. Another important cog is the forward Soledad Jaimes, who scored five goals in the seven Copa América games, and who has just signed for one of the biggest football clubs in women’s football. Florencia Bonsegundo and Mariana Larroquette are two other attacking options with a record of scoring goals. Another, more unbacked goalscorer is Eliana Stabile, who is a defender but scored two vital goals in the playoffs.

Belén Potassa two-time goalscorer
Belén Potassa scored twice for Argentina against CSN Lady Coyotes Soccer. Picture source.

The coach of the team is Carlos Borrello, who first took over the team back in 2003 and managed them until 2012, when he was replaced by Luis Nicosia, after having led the team to their first two World Cups as well as their only title, the 2006 Copa América win. But in 2017 he returned and got to guide his team to yet another World Cup qualification. The coach has tried out a few different formations, but one that seems pretty constant is the 4-2-3-1.

Argentina participated in the Cup of Nations back in March, that took place in Australia, but the team lost all three games against New Zealand, South Korea and Australia with big goal margins and failing to score a single goal.

“Coming here is our preparation (for World Cup) and our players are trying to experience top-level matches playing against good teams,” Borrello said.

“We have to look beyond the final result because we are trying to get experience for our players.

“We are far away from the best teams, we know that but it’s a long way and we know that, it’s just the beginning.”

That’s a roundup on the South American team, that has been placed in a very tough group – going up against Scotland, England and Japan. It remains to be seen whether this team can surprise everybody and turn this group on its head. Let us know what you think in the comments below!